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Why Are Recumbent Trikes So Expensive? All You Need to Know

There were several times I rode on recumbent trikes, and with every ride, I just wanted to own one. However, I discovered that these recumbent bikes cost a lot in the quest to own one, which took me on my research to discover the reason.

Undoubtedly, anyone knowledgeable about recumbent bikes can attest to them being an excellent
tool for exercise and other activities. However, one consistent thing that keeps putting people off
from owning this unique piece of equipment is the price.

So, if you have ever wondered, “why are recumbent trikes so expensive,” then this article is for you.
Let’s dive in!

What Makes Recumbent Trikes Expensive?

Here’s the deal with these bikes; from my research, several factors affect the pricing of recumbent
bicycles. Personally, the extra designs play a significant role in influencing the price. Regardless, I will
reveal some of the things that make recumbent tricycles expensive.

A man riding a recumbent trike in Australia

1. Additional Design Consideration

When you look closely at the recumbent trikes, you can immediately differentiate them from the
traditional bicycles. Apart from the apparent different usage, there is the extra designing feature
recumbent bikes possess.

Most times, in a bid to make high-end recumbent riding equipment, the manufacturers add “not-so-
necessary” designs. For instance, the machinery involved in bending the broad tubing in a high-end
trike has higher pricing than the straight or butted tube.

From my research, I discovered that one of the parts affecting recumbent price has to do with the
seats. Unlike traditional bikes, recumbents are expensive and have softer, larger, and more
comfortable seating, which cost more during production.

2. Specific Customized Parts

The custom-provided seating of recumbent trikes could cost up to (or over) $200+. In contrast, the
traditional saddle has prices less than $5. Besides, running the entire recumbent trike between
distances requires the uniform movement of all propelling tyres.

A regular bike has chains that are long enough to run between both tyres. But, with recumbent
bicycles, the chain length is usually longer (2 or 3 lengths more). In control, the recumbent bike has a
custom steering component that differs from the traditional bicycle (2).

This part of the recumbent bike costs more than the average control component of a regular bicycle.
In fact, recumbent bikes possess extra cable housing and tandem lengths.

3. Style And Support

Any recumbent trike owner will tell you one generic truth, “it offers better support compared to the
traditional bicycles or upright bikes.” And if we are honest, this stylishly supportive system makes
them a good use for people who require back support during workouts.

The full support on these tricycles is expensive but worth the buy because it will keep your back
from having strained joints. However, due to the extra support of recumbent trikes and their
usefulness for people with physical challenges, the pricing can increase.

Additionally, the two-wheel traditional biking system requires more support to achieve the ideal
balance for trainers, especially older citizens. The three-wheel (one in front, two in back) design
makes it look and feel more balanced/supportive for all who use it.

4. Customer Demands

This brings us back to the usual economics of things in the market. For any shopping, the quantity of
all products determines the pricing alongside the customer’s demand for items. So, if the number of
recumbent bikes is low, the cost for one will increase – vice versa.

Additionally, when the demand from customers becomes excessively high (maybe due to grown
popularity), some manufacturers tend to reduce the production to increase the price. So, what will
grow recumbent trikes’ popularity? Many things, like allowing them to compete in major events.

5. Safe to Use

Firstly, let’s look at the recumbent trike and compare it with the regular upright bike. You can easily
spot the one with more safety. This is because the three-wheel system of recumbent trikes adds
stability, making it safer – you are less likely to fall over during exercises.

Also, the design of these trikes gives it a low centre of gravity, which in turn enhances your overall
stability. This means you can confidently and safely focus on other things while riding, and you can
be confident you won’t tip over easily.

Lastly, on the road, recumbent trikes have proven to be better “manoeuvring bicycles” when
compared to traditional bikes for preventing accidents. The need to maintain balance on a two-
wheeler bike will affect the rider’s quick reflex when manoeuvring.

Conclusion

Generally, several factors affect the pricing of recumbent trikes, and if you closely observe, you can
tell that they are pretty expensive.

However, this article has answered, “why are recumbent trikes so expensive.” If you go shopping for
recumbent trikes and you spot an outrageously high amount, you can trace the reasons for this
article.

FAQs

Personally, the biggest reason these bikes are not popular is due to their pricing. Most times,

recumbent bikes do not offer clear advantages over traditional bicycles. These combined reasons

affected the supposed “high popularity” recumbent bikes might have had.

Here’s one significant truth about recumbent bikes – they usually have more problems than you will

find on traditional bicycles. In addition, unlike the traditional bicycles that you can carry around

easily, recumbent bikes tend to be a lot harder to move around without riding because of their

weight.

The answer is dependent on the bike use. For instance, recumbent bikes are worth buying for a

trainer because you can work on your leg muscles while retaining a comfortable position.

However, you might want to pick the traditional bicycle over the recumbent bike for a rider on the

road. So, in terms of “buy worth,” I will say it depends on the owner’s use.

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